barometric pressure headaches

I’ve been learning all sorts of fancy new words for the “beat me over the head with a cricket bat, why don’t you” headaches that occasionally knock me on my ass. It turns out, all those times I thought “I wonder if the rain clouds are giving me a headache…no, that’s ridiculous,” I could have been right!

There have been studies that show barometric pressure can bring on headaches and migraines in some sufferers. No one’s entirely sure why yet (yay, science!) but up to 2 or 3 days before the weather changes a headache can set in as a result of the change in air pressure.

I’ve also learnt about “visual auras”, “fortification spectrum”, “scintillating scotoma”, “dysphasic auras” and the “postdrome phase”. More specifically, I’ve learnt that these are all the fancy doctoring words that apply to my weird hallucinations and unusual behaviour before & after a full-on migraine.

And what does all this add up to? It means that next time I have to leave work in the middle of the day, I can tell my boss I’m having a scintillating scotoma visual aura and possibly a dysphasic aura and that I need to go home and rest until I’m through the postdrome phase.

Like I’ll remember that.

The above picture is an artist’s impression of a scotoma that can appear before a migraine. It starts out tiny, just in the corner of your vision, flickering like static on a TV. Gradually it gets bigger and bigger, becomes a circle, moves toward the centre of your vision and finally you can’t see the face of someone standing right in front of you.

Creepy, huh?

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